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It's all about the Tux

2013
Johnny Tuxedo is Born

Johnny Tuxedo to the rescue! From Ilkley on the banks of the River Wharfe in Yorkshire, Johnny has launched a tux that combines the best of British tailoring heritage with devilish detail and a really sharp cut. And it’s durable and washable. Historic news. Here’s to the next 100 years!

2013
2000s
Rise of the Prom

Finally, after 150 years, the tux made it onto the shoulders of the younger generation thanks to the rise of the school prom. Bond seemed to be everywhere looking cool and sophisticated but where could our desperate students get the look for under £100?

2000s
1980s
Up to 1990s

A welcome return to normality for our heroic suit - narrower lapels, black suits with subtle satin trim, white shirts and black bows. Pretty much where we are today except the trousers were looser and the jackets too boxy.

1980s
1950
Up to 1970s

In the 50s, coloured jackets, cummerbunds and bow ties gave the tux a makeover. Lapels got narrower, but 20 years later they got wider again – much wider, with brighter colours and satin braid also joining the party. It wasn’t pretty but you can blame the drugs.

1950s
1930s
Post World War II

As fashion became more casual and relaxed, the Tux started to be reserved for special occasions.

Post World War II
1900s
Between the World Wars

The Tux became the norm for evening wear and tailcoats were reserved for very formal or ceremonial occasions.

Between the World Wars
1889
First Mentioned

The Oxford English Dictionary states that the first mention of the Tuxedo was in 1889 in an issue of the Sartorial Arts Journal. The first mention of a Dinner Jacket was in 1891. The Tux came first.

1889
1886
Royalty

When the Prince of Wales invited millionaire coffee broker James Potter to dinner, Potter asked about the dress code. The Prince sent him to his tailor to get a short evening jacket. When Potter returned to New York he regularly wore it to his prestigious country club, Tuxedo Park, where it caught on and became known as the Park. Not really.

1886
1800s
Victorians

You have the Prince of Wales to thank for the tux. And Henry Poole & Co. Between them they cooked up an outfit to wear to informal dinner parties in the 1860s. By 1885, the Prince was ordering ‘tailless jackets” and the next step was to make them in black wool and add the same satin trim normally used for tail coats. Boom, the tux was born.

1800s